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Oh Canada


Husker_Du

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14 hours ago, Husker_Du said:

lol.

my credibility? oh the irony. in the same post you say i know nothing about a family farm.

anyway - stop getting butt hurt

i'm simply stating that no 'dairy' farm doesn't cool the milk immediately. 

if you mean the place has/had like 1 or 2 cows i get it. 

Handful of cows. My parents grew up on real farms and it was important to them that we grew up understanding it. They didn't have fond memories as much as they thought it would be good for us. Kind of like... "see, this is how we had to do it - not much fun - now, maybe you find a better way for yourself."

Had a similar experience late in high school and early college working high-risk construction with my best friend. My boss (who was my bf's dad) would literally tell us that "this is why you want to graduate from college - you do not want to do this your whole life."

It stuck, both times. 

I went into neither farming nor construction. But I do like olives and am partial to Russian Olive trees.

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It’s amazing that I followed much of the dairy farming discussion with great interest and understood the argument - my wife is the daughter of dairy farmers … so yeah, add another wrestling family to the dairy farming subgroup. And we border Canada … to get this tied to the topic.

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Jason Bryant hasn't worked here since 2008. 

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10 minutes ago, Jason Bryant said:

It’s amazing that I followed much of the dairy farming discussion with great interest and understood the argument - my wife is the daughter of dairy farmers … so yeah, add another wrestling family to the dairy farming subgroup. And we border Canada … to get this tied to the topic.

If I remember correctly, Bailey O'Reilly used to wake up early before school and do chores on his family dairy farm. Bailey was from Minnesota, which borders Canada. 

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Well, my Dad inherited his family farm in Minnesota,  but that was in the days when farming was diversified,  so you didn't just milk, or as upper midwest dairy farmers say,  "mewk," cows. You farmed grain,  beef cows,  dairy,  hogs,  etc.

My Mom wanted nothing to do with the country life any longer,  so he handed it off to his brother and we moved to the city (albeit in the country). My uncle then ran it as a dairy and grain farm,  which is unusual today. 

And,  yes,  our Minnesota bordered Canada too.

Edited by Ban Basketball
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Owner of over two decades of the most dangerous words on the internet!  In fact, during the short life of this forum, me's culture has been cancelled three times on this very site!

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If I remember correctly, Bailey O'Reilly used to wake up early before school and do chores on his family dairy farm. Bailey was from Minnesota, which borders Canada. 

I also live in Minnesota, but about an hour north of where O’Reilly is from.
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Jason Bryant hasn't worked here since 2008. 

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In response to the opening post of the thread/topic:

Read “The Grapes of Wrath”.

A relevant passage. The one the book draws its title from:

“The works of the roots of the vines, of the trees, must be destroyed to keep up the price, and this is the saddest, bitterest thing of all. Carloads of oranges dumped on the ground. The people came for miles to take the fruit, but this could not be. How would they buy oranges at twenty cents a dozen if they could drive out and pick them up? And men with hoses squirt kerosene on the oranges, and they are angry at the crime, angry at the people who have come to take the fruit. A million people hungry, needing the fruit- and kerosene sprayed over the golden mountains. And the smell of rot fills the country. Burn coffee for fuel in the ships. Burn corn to keep warm, it makes a hot fire. Dump potatoes in the rivers and place guards along the banks to keep the hungry people from fishing them out. Slaughter the pigs and bury them, and let the putrescence drip down into the earth.

There is a crime here that goes beyond denunciation. There is a sorrow here that weeping cannot symbolize. There is a failure here that topples all our success. The fertile earth, the straight tree rows, the sturdy trunks, and the ripe fruit. And children dying of pellagra must die because a profit cannot be taken from an orange. And coroners must fill in the certificate- died of malnutrition- because the food must rot, must be forced to rot. The people come with nets to fish for potatoes in the river, and the guards hold them back; they come in rattling cars to get the dumped oranges, but the kerosene is sprayed. And they stand still and watch the potatoes float by, listen to the screaming pigs being killed in a ditch and covered with quick-lime, watch the mountains of oranges slop down to a putrefying ooze; and in the eyes of the people there is the failure; and in the eyes of the hungry there is a growing wrath. In the souls of the people the grapes of wrath are filling and growing heavy, growing heavy for the vintage.”

The US has been doing this, at the behest of corporations large and small, and the US Gov, for a long ass time.


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Though it is true that the government, in collaboration with farmers and organizations, subsidize and manipulate markets, no, the government does not force any of them to destroy their products.  There are times when there are not enough sales, and someone has to dump products that are not able to be sold, but far from the peasants fishing potatoes out of the creek, they are provided with debit cards to do their shopping.  

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2 hours ago, Husker_Du said:

do they (The U.S.) do it now? where and what industry? 

can we agree that (if they do) it's also wrong?

I'm not so sure that it is directly US gov related and more related to the unions that the food processors belong to. They will do anything to "protect the price of their product". So if there is over production, rather than momentarily lower the price, they will dispose of the product and the union will pay for it.

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3 minutes ago, Gus said:

I'm not so sure that it is directly US gov related and more related to the unions that the food processors belong to. They will do anything to "protect the price of their product". So if there is over production, rather than momentarily lower the price, they will dispose of the product and the union will pay for it.

Where, when, what product?

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4 minutes ago, ionel said:

Where, when, what product?

Milk mainly.  There were stories about dumping during the plandemic.  There were also trucks that came around giving free groceries at about the same time.  Milk was one of the things that were given away.  Potatoes, onions, also.  I don’t remember what all. 

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1 minute ago, Offthemat said:

Milk mainly.  There were stories about dumping during the plandemic.  There were also trucks that came around giving free groceries at about the same time.  Milk was one of the things that were given away.  Potatoes, onions, also.  I don’t remember what all. 

I'm sure we dumped some milk back when still had dairy on farm.  If electricity went out farmers got together to hand milk but there was no place to go with the milk except our normal fresh breakfast consumption. 

But I was more interested in the where, when, what products Gus was talking about related to unions and food processors.

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1 hour ago, ionel said:

I'm sure we dumped some milk back when still had dairy on farm.  If electricity went out farmers got together to hand milk but there was no place to go with the milk except our normal fresh breakfast consumption. 

But I was more interested in the where, when, what products Gus was talking about related to unions and food processors.

Milk for sure

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In the 80s the gov’t offered to pay dairy farmers the average of what they were making every month for ten years if they sold their dairy cows.  They could do whatever they wanted with their farm; beef, grain, crops, anything.  But they couldn’t dairy for ten years or they lost the deal.  My friend turned it down.  He said he had worked too long and hard to get a herd of heifers like he had.  About three or four years later he got hired at American Airlines.  

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4 hours ago, Offthemat said:

Milk mainly.  There were stories about dumping during the plandemic.  There were also trucks that came around giving free groceries at about the same time.  Milk was one of the things that were given away.  Potatoes, onions, also.  I don’t remember what all. 

i don't understand.

seems contradictory. 

if the theory is price control - one of those inflates it, the other suppresses

Jason Bryant works here. 

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8 minutes ago, ionel said:

Milk has a limited shelf life so it is different than most ag products.  If there's excess supply, no place to store, no transportation, what is the option except to discard?

I agree that is sometimes the only logical thing to do but in a lot of cases unions are encouraging dairies to dump to protect the price. Unions suck.

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What we are talking about happened during the depression as a way to increase prices.   My dad witnessed this as a kid.  He wondered why farmers were digging up their crops while people were starving.  Fortunately nowadays, we don't have that as much as we did during the 1930s, the starving paradigm that is.  

mspart

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