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One principle that stands above all others: personal accountability


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5 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Your comment doesn't factor in a flat tax but is a comment on the current tax system. My opinion is that they don't pay their fair share. If you think they do, currently. Please defend that position? 

 

Oh and the chart that was presented by mspart clearly defends my position in the current system.   Over 40% don’t pay federal income tax as it is.  

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2 minutes ago, JimmyBT said:

Not my fault you can’t or didn’t read my comment right above that one. Again, with a flat tax, which I strongly support your hypothetical doesn’t exist.  

That's fair. Glad you had the temperament and patience to point that out. Instead of trying dunk on someone that couldn't read your mind or interpret the hidden meaning behind your fairly obvious and simple comment. 

With that being said, do you have literature, scholarship, or studies that might support a flat tax as being more fair and equitable? 

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1 minute ago, JimmyBT said:

Oh and the chart that was presented by mspart clearly defends my position without a flat tax.  Over 40% don’t pay federal income tax as it is.  

Why do you feel the lowest earners in our economy should pay more in taxes than they already do? 

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2 minutes ago, JimmyBT said:

Oh and the chart that was presented by mspart clearly defends my position without a flat tax.  Over 40% don’t pay federal income tax as it is.  

The poor, as we all know and has been stated before, are flush with extra cash after paying their bills. The do pay up to 9.6% in sales tax when they buy just about all the things they need to survive. So as far as that is concerned they already pay the flat tax you are interested to implement. 

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Just now, ThreePointTakedown said:

The poor, as we all know and has been stated before, are flush with extra cash after paying their bills. The do pay up to 9.6% in sales tax when they buy just about all the things they need to survive. So as far as that is concerned they already pay the flat tax you are interested to implement. 

So does everyone else. Up to.  Bahahhahahaha.  And we’re talking about income tax 

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2 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

The poor, as we all know and has been stated before, are flush with extra cash after paying their bills. The do pay up to 9.6% in sales tax when they buy just about all the things they need to survive. So as far as that is concerned they already pay the flat tax you are interested to implement. 

Please tell me what exactly is it that people need to survive these days? 

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1 minute ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Some of the hardest states to be poor in: Sales tax, LA-9.56%, TN-9.55% AR-9.45% WA-9.39% AL-9.29%

Sorry that you don't consider this tax. 

Some states have zero soooooo. Looks to me like California is the hardest place to be poor with all the homelessness they have there. 

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1 minute ago, JimmyBT said:

So does everyone else. Up to.  Bahahhahahaha.  And we’re talking about income tax 

We're talking about taxes, that's it. Sorry that examples of rich not paying much if any taxes through income and poor paying WAAAAY more than that just in sales tax doesn't help to make your case for a new fantasy tax system. 

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1 minute ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

We're talking about taxes, that's it. Sorry that examples of rich not paying much if any taxes through income and poor paying WAAAAY more than that just in sales tax doesn't help to make your case for a new fantasy tax system. 

Everyone pays sales tax.  Derp 

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1 minute ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

What is the point of this comment? 

Poor people should get up and move to that state. Is that your solution? 

It’s the same point you’re making listing the highest ones.  

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5 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

What is the point of this comment? 

Poor people should get up and move to that state. Is that your solution? 

It’s funny how a migrant can make it across countries yet someone here can’t move to a different state.  There’s thousands and thousands living California as we speak. Why?  Taxes and cost of living 

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Just now, JimmyBT said:

Everyone lays sales tax.  Derp 

This is a point for how there is no such thing as common sense. 

Do rich people need to eat more or wash their clothes more or fill their car with gas more or any of the many things that people need to pay for to live? 

The answer is no. 

https://www.courts.ca.gov/documents/BTB25-PreCon4-15.pdf

Transportation. To get to work, a low-income person often must obtain a personal car, especially in rural areas that lack public transportation. Without a solid credit history, a low-wage earner may be forced to finance a car with a "sub-prime" lender, which charges a much higher rate - sometimes double or triple the prime rate. That can cost thousands of dollars extra in finance charges. Low-wage earners also are typically limited to cheaper and less efficient cars, which cost more to operate in fuel and repairs. In many low-income metropolitan neighborhoods, automobile insurance is more expensive - as much as $1,000 more a year .

Household goods. Low-income areas are often economically isolated. There is less business development, therefore less retail competition. The only choices in shopping for groceries, clothing, medicine, furniture and other household necessities may be smaller stores that lack the economy of scale to offer discount prices. Some cash-strapped consumers resort to rent-to-own businesses to buy furniture, appliances and electronics for lower monthly payments, but in the long run they pay as much as two to three times more than cash buyers do .

Housing. Affordable rental housing is in short supply, which often means low-income families pay considerably more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. Those who want to buy a home often wind up, because of a poor credit history or a lack of lending agencies in the area, with a mortgage from a "sub-prime" lender that charges twice the rate of a prime loan. The higher interest can add as much as $500 to the monthly mortgage payment. In rural areas, the poor often opt for manufactured housing because it's initially less expensive. However, a mobile home costs more to finance because it's personal property, and, unlike a house, it depreciates in value. Furthermore, the cost of homeowner's insurance in lower-income neighborhoods can be as much as $300 more than higher-income neighborhoods ../

Health care. Only 30.8 percent of people earning $25,000 a year or less have health insurance paid by employers, compared with 79.7 percent of people earning $75,000 or more, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (2016). For low-income families, that means more out-ofpocket expenses for health care. Many are forced to choose between filling a prescription or a sack of groceries. Delayed medical care typically results in worsened health conditions, which are even more expensive to treat . ../ Child care. The working poor are often single parents who must arrange for care of their children. Nationally, the cost averages $9,589 per year per child, which is difficult to absorb into a modest budget (New America Care Report , 2015). As a disproportionate bite of a low income, it can squeeze out other necessities . ../

Financial services. Poor neighborhoods and rural areas often lack mainstream financial institutions. As a result, the areas are targets for predatory financial industries, such as check-cashing outlets and payday lenders, which charge high fees for the convenience of quick cash and credit. Low-wage workers may spend 2-3 percent of their pay just to obtain cash and can pay up to 521 percent annual percentage rates if they fail to repay loans due on the borrower's payday (Pew Trusts, 2012). The higher fees, finance charges and other costs add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars spent by low-income families every year. Unfortunately, low-income families often lack the skills and resources to be savvy consumers. They are less likely to have access to the Internet, newspapers and other resources to comparison shop and learn good money management in order to get the most for their dollar.

At the end of the day, it costs more to be poor.

(copy/pasted from the site) 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

This is a point for how there is no such thing as common sense. 

Do rich people need to eat more or wash their clothes more or fill their car with gas more or any of the many things that people need to pay for to live? 

The answer is no. 

https://www.courts.ca.gov/documents/BTB25-PreCon4-15.pdf

Transportation. To get to work, a low-income person often must obtain a personal car, especially in rural areas that lack public transportation. Without a solid credit history, a low-wage earner may be forced to finance a car with a "sub-prime" lender, which charges a much higher rate - sometimes double or triple the prime rate. That can cost thousands of dollars extra in finance charges. Low-wage earners also are typically limited to cheaper and less efficient cars, which cost more to operate in fuel and repairs. In many low-income metropolitan neighborhoods, automobile insurance is more expensive - as much as $1,000 more a year .

Household goods. Low-income areas are often economically isolated. There is less business development, therefore less retail competition. The only choices in shopping for groceries, clothing, medicine, furniture and other household necessities may be smaller stores that lack the economy of scale to offer discount prices. Some cash-strapped consumers resort to rent-to-own businesses to buy furniture, appliances and electronics for lower monthly payments, but in the long run they pay as much as two to three times more than cash buyers do .

Housing. Affordable rental housing is in short supply, which often means low-income families pay considerably more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. Those who want to buy a home often wind up, because of a poor credit history or a lack of lending agencies in the area, with a mortgage from a "sub-prime" lender that charges twice the rate of a prime loan. The higher interest can add as much as $500 to the monthly mortgage payment. In rural areas, the poor often opt for manufactured housing because it's initially less expensive. However, a mobile home costs more to finance because it's personal property, and, unlike a house, it depreciates in value. Furthermore, the cost of homeowner's insurance in lower-income neighborhoods can be as much as $300 more than higher-income neighborhoods ../

Health care. Only 30.8 percent of people earning $25,000 a year or less have health insurance paid by employers, compared with 79.7 percent of people earning $75,000 or more, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (2016). For low-income families, that means more out-ofpocket expenses for health care. Many are forced to choose between filling a prescription or a sack of groceries. Delayed medical care typically results in worsened health conditions, which are even more expensive to treat . ../ Child care. The working poor are often single parents who must arrange for care of their children. Nationally, the cost averages $9,589 per year per child, which is difficult to absorb into a modest budget (New America Care Report , 2015). As a disproportionate bite of a low income, it can squeeze out other necessities . ../

Financial services. Poor neighborhoods and rural areas often lack mainstream financial institutions. As a result, the areas are targets for predatory financial industries, such as check-cashing outlets and payday lenders, which charge high fees for the convenience of quick cash and credit. Low-wage workers may spend 2-3 percent of their pay just to obtain cash and can pay up to 521 percent annual percentage rates if they fail to repay loans due on the borrower's payday (Pew Trusts, 2012). The higher fees, finance charges and other costs add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars spent by low-income families every year. Unfortunately, low-income families often lack the skills and resources to be savvy consumers. They are less likely to have access to the Internet, newspapers and other resources to comparison shop and learn good money management in order to get the most for their dollar.

At the end of the day, it costs more to be poor.

(copy/pasted from the site) 

 

 

 

14 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

This is a point for how there is no such thing as common sense. 

Do rich people need to eat more or wash their clothes more or fill their car with gas more or any of the many things that people need to pay for to live? 

The answer is no. 

https://www.courts.ca.gov/documents/BTB25-PreCon4-15.pdf

Transportation. To get to work, a low-income person often must obtain a personal car, especially in rural areas that lack public transportation. Without a solid credit history, a low-wage earner may be forced to finance a car with a "sub-prime" lender, which charges a much higher rate - sometimes double or triple the prime rate. That can cost thousands of dollars extra in finance charges. Low-wage earners also are typically limited to cheaper and less efficient cars, which cost more to operate in fuel and repairs. In many low-income metropolitan neighborhoods, automobile insurance is more expensive - as much as $1,000 more a year .

Household goods. Low-income areas are often economically isolated. There is less business development, therefore less retail competition. The only choices in shopping for groceries, clothing, medicine, furniture and other household necessities may be smaller stores that lack the economy of scale to offer discount prices. Some cash-strapped consumers resort to rent-to-own businesses to buy furniture, appliances and electronics for lower monthly payments, but in the long run they pay as much as two to three times more than cash buyers do .

Housing. Affordable rental housing is in short supply, which often means low-income families pay considerably more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. Those who want to buy a home often wind up, because of a poor credit history or a lack of lending agencies in the area, with a mortgage from a "sub-prime" lender that charges twice the rate of a prime loan. The higher interest can add as much as $500 to the monthly mortgage payment. In rural areas, the poor often opt for manufactured housing because it's initially less expensive. However, a mobile home costs more to finance because it's personal property, and, unlike a house, it depreciates in value. Furthermore, the cost of homeowner's insurance in lower-income neighborhoods can be as much as $300 more than higher-income neighborhoods ../

Health care. Only 30.8 percent of people earning $25,000 a year or less have health insurance paid by employers, compared with 79.7 percent of people earning $75,000 or more, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (2016). For low-income families, that means more out-ofpocket expenses for health care. Many are forced to choose between filling a prescription or a sack of groceries. Delayed medical care typically results in worsened health conditions, which are even more expensive to treat . ../ Child care. The working poor are often single parents who must arrange for care of their children. Nationally, the cost averages $9,589 per year per child, which is difficult to absorb into a modest budget (New America Care Report , 2015). As a disproportionate bite of a low income, it can squeeze out other necessities . ../

Financial services. Poor neighborhoods and rural areas often lack mainstream financial institutions. As a result, the areas are targets for predatory financial industries, such as check-cashing outlets and payday lenders, which charge high fees for the convenience of quick cash and credit. Low-wage workers may spend 2-3 percent of their pay just to obtain cash and can pay up to 521 percent annual percentage rates if they fail to repay loans due on the borrower's payday (Pew Trusts, 2012). The higher fees, finance charges and other costs add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars spent by low-income families every year. Unfortunately, low-income families often lack the skills and resources to be savvy consumers. They are less likely to have access to the Internet, newspapers and other resources to comparison shop and learn good money management in order to get the most for their dollar.

At the end of the day, it costs more to be poor.

(copy/pasted from the site) 

 

 

I’m so glad I’m not you.   It HAS to be hard to get your ass kicked by life every day.  Everyone one of those things can be remedied very easily in this country if someone wants to make it happen.   Keep up with the drama though.  Youre say gooder attitude will save the world. 

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25 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

This is a point for how there is no such thing as common sense. 

Do rich people need to eat more or wash their clothes more or fill their car with gas more or any of the many things that people need to pay for to live? 

The answer is no. 

https://www.courts.ca.gov/documents/BTB25-PreCon4-15.pdf

Transportation. To get to work, a low-income person often must obtain a personal car, especially in rural areas that lack public transportation. Without a solid credit history, a low-wage earner may be forced to finance a car with a "sub-prime" lender, which charges a much higher rate - sometimes double or triple the prime rate. That can cost thousands of dollars extra in finance charges. Low-wage earners also are typically limited to cheaper and less efficient cars, which cost more to operate in fuel and repairs. In many low-income metropolitan neighborhoods, automobile insurance is more expensive - as much as $1,000 more a year .

Household goods. Low-income areas are often economically isolated. There is less business development, therefore less retail competition. The only choices in shopping for groceries, clothing, medicine, furniture and other household necessities may be smaller stores that lack the economy of scale to offer discount prices. Some cash-strapped consumers resort to rent-to-own businesses to buy furniture, appliances and electronics for lower monthly payments, but in the long run they pay as much as two to three times more than cash buyers do .

Housing. Affordable rental housing is in short supply, which often means low-income families pay considerably more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. Those who want to buy a home often wind up, because of a poor credit history or a lack of lending agencies in the area, with a mortgage from a "sub-prime" lender that charges twice the rate of a prime loan. The higher interest can add as much as $500 to the monthly mortgage payment. In rural areas, the poor often opt for manufactured housing because it's initially less expensive. However, a mobile home costs more to finance because it's personal property, and, unlike a house, it depreciates in value. Furthermore, the cost of homeowner's insurance in lower-income neighborhoods can be as much as $300 more than higher-income neighborhoods ../

Health care. Only 30.8 percent of people earning $25,000 a year or less have health insurance paid by employers, compared with 79.7 percent of people earning $75,000 or more, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (2016). For low-income families, that means more out-ofpocket expenses for health care. Many are forced to choose between filling a prescription or a sack of groceries. Delayed medical care typically results in worsened health conditions, which are even more expensive to treat . ../ Child care. The working poor are often single parents who must arrange for care of their children. Nationally, the cost averages $9,589 per year per child, which is difficult to absorb into a modest budget (New America Care Report , 2015). As a disproportionate bite of a low income, it can squeeze out other necessities . ../

Financial services. Poor neighborhoods and rural areas often lack mainstream financial institutions. As a result, the areas are targets for predatory financial industries, such as check-cashing outlets and payday lenders, which charge high fees for the convenience of quick cash and credit. Low-wage workers may spend 2-3 percent of their pay just to obtain cash and can pay up to 521 percent annual percentage rates if they fail to repay loans due on the borrower's payday (Pew Trusts, 2012). The higher fees, finance charges and other costs add up to hundreds or thousands of dollars spent by low-income families every year. Unfortunately, low-income families often lack the skills and resources to be savvy consumers. They are less likely to have access to the Internet, newspapers and other resources to comparison shop and learn good money management in order to get the most for their dollar.

At the end of the day, it costs more to be poor.

(copy/pasted from the site) 

 


in your babble blast

often must

often (5x)

sometimes

Typically limited

as much as 

considerably

can add

many

may be (5x)

may

less likely

 

Edited by JimmyBT
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  • 2 weeks later...

My boy's baseball team lost an exciting close game in the tournament.  The umpires made a few atrocious calls that went against us and the boys were upset.  After the game, I did my best Cael speech about gratitude, and how loss hurt, but we'd move past this and forget about it quickly.  The I asked why we lost.  The answers were unanimous: "the umpires."  No!

What opportunities did you miss at bat? Where can you improve your fielding? Did you make any baserunning mistakes? These are the areas where we can make a difference, regardless of the calls made on the field.  

PERSONAL ACCOUNTABILITY

My 11U team is used batting against 50 mph rather than 63 mph.  They are used to big hits that go 200 feet, not 270 feet!  We went 3-1 against 12U teams this weekend.  Not bad.

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8 hours ago, jross said:

My boy's baseball team lost an exciting close game in the tournament.  The umpires made a few atrocious calls that went against us and the boys were upset.  After the game, I did my best Cael speech about gratitude, and how loss hurt, but we'd move past this and forget about it quickly.  The I asked why we lost.  The answers were unanimous: "the umpires."  No!

What opportunities did you miss at bat? Where can you improve your fielding? Did you make any baserunning mistakes? These are the areas where we can make a difference, regardless of the calls made on the field.  

PERSONAL ACCOUNTABILITY

My 11U team is used batting against 50 mph rather than 63 mph.  They are used to big hits that go 200 feet, not 270 feet!  We went 3-1 against 12U teams this weekend.  Not bad.

Did you ask them how they would go about getting better at fielding if they didn't have a glove or better at batting if they couldn't afford a bat or how to get better at baseball if they couldn't afford to play on a team? I'm curious what their ideas would be. 

Your example doesn't work. Some people are born without a bat, glove, or team. You can't use accountability or pull up boot straps if you don't have boots. 

The suggestion that someone should look towards successful people from outside of their own immediate environment and then model that behavior in the hopes of rising to or matching their level of success, is interesting.  I would love to understand your reasoning behind this hypothesis. 

A book to consider: 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK547371/ 

 

Edited by ThreePointTakedown
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2 hours ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Did you ask them how they would go about getting better at fielding if they didn't have a glove or better at batting if they couldn't afford a bat or how to get better at baseball if they couldn't afford to play on a team? I'm curious what their ideas would be. 

Your example doesn't work. Some people are born without a bat, glove, or team. You can't use accountability or pull up boot straps if you don't have boots. 

This is a competitive team full of motivated kids that I volunteerly coach.  I've donated countless hours and a few thousand dollars.

Captain America Lol GIF by mtv


Second, NO EXCUSES

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17 hours ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Did you ask them how they would go about getting better at fielding if they didn't have a glove or better at batting if they couldn't afford a bat or how to get better at baseball if they couldn't afford to play on a team? I'm curious what their ideas would be. 

Your example doesn't work. Some people are born without a bat, glove, or team. You can't use accountability or pull up boot straps if you don't have boots. 

The suggestion that someone should look towards successful people from outside of their own immediate environment and then model that behavior in the hopes of rising to or matching their level of success, is interesting.  I would love to understand your reasoning behind this hypothesis. 

A book to consider: 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK547371/ 

 

I feel bad for the moms of the kids who were born with a bat, glove, and/or team...ouch.

In all seriousness, I grew up poor as f...parents never bought me anything for sports, nor signed me up for any sport, and maybe came to 2 or 3 games/matches...I wrestled, played football, and baseball...wonder how I was able to do that?? Oh, and how did I ever get a glove, bat, singlet, shoes, etc...hmmm??  Oh yeah...worked a job since I was 11 to pay for those things.  

According to you I should've had no chance of ever playing, yet alone being any good at any of those things...but as usual, you are very wrong...AGAIN!!

Keep reading your books and wallowing in the complete lack of understanding of the real world at your educational job.

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1 hour ago, Bigbrog said:

I feel bad for the moms of the kids who were born with a bat, glove, and/or team...ouch.

In all seriousness, I grew up poor as f...parents never bought me anything for sports, nor signed me up for any sport, and maybe came to 2 or 3 games/matches...I wrestled, played football, and baseball...wonder how I was able to do that?? Oh, and how did I ever get a glove, bat, singlet, shoes, etc...hmmm??  Oh yeah...worked a job since I was 11 to pay for those things.  

3rd - According to you I should've had no chance of ever playing, yet alone being any good at any of those things...but as usual, you are very wrong...AGAIN!!

Keep reading your books and wallowing in the complete lack of understanding of the real world at your educational job.

Funny joke. Ouch. 

Not sure you're seeing my point at all. And you're taking my comment as a personal attack on you. Why is that? Did I reference you specifically? No. Regulate your emotions and try to read the words without putting you and your trauma into the situation and twisting it. 

I'm sorry you needed to work when you should've been able to be a kid. Must've been tough in hindsight. But I imagine you felt it was just what you needed to do to get where you wanted to go? What are the pros and cons of growing up like that( I didn't, I'm interested to know)? Would you do it again given the opportunity? Would you wish that childhood on anyone else, why or why not?

3rd. Never said you or anyone else shouldn't have a chance. The scenario is getting better at elements of a sport that needs equipment. If you don't have the necessary equipment how much better could you possibly be or get? What I was trying to highlight was that people, mostly children, that do not have the exposure to things or the resources to get better at those things to improve their lives/station will, like you, have to work much harder than might've otherwise  be necessary as a CHILD. So the example of already having bats, balls, gloves, and a team to practice with breaks down if you don't have those things to start with. Which is, sorry for the woke term, a privilege you don't realize you have. You probably would've turned out different had you had the privilege of not having to work for every little thing. The argument would then turn to, would your outcome be better or worse with that privilege. But you probably suffered more trauma living the way you did that could've been mitigated by having a few things that most people take for granted: baseball bat or glove to take to little league.  Can't be wrong at something I never said. 

Do you have a bias against educational jobs or people that work them? 

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16 hours ago, jross said:

This is a competitive team full of motivated kids that I volunteerly coach.  I've donated countless hours and a few thousand dollars.

Captain America Lol GIF by mtv


Second, NO EXCUSES

Would this person need to know of the sport of baseball to practice and get better at it? 

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1 minute ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Funny joke. Ouch. 

Not sure you're seeing my point at all. And you're taking my comment as a personal attack on you. Why is that? Did I reference you specifically? No. Regulate your emotions and try to read the words without putting you and your trauma into the situation and twisting it. 

I'm sorry you needed to work when you should've been able to be a kid. Must've been tough in hindsight. But I imagine you felt it was just what you needed to do to get where you wanted to go? What are the pros and cons of growing up like that( I didn't, I'm interested to know)? Would you do it again given the opportunity? Would you wish that childhood on anyone else, why or why not?

3rd. Never said you or anyone else shouldn't have a chance. The scenario is getting better at elements of a sport that needs equipment. If you don't have the necessary equipment how much better could you possibly be or get? What I was trying to highlight was that people, mostly children, that do not have the exposure to things or the resources to get better at those things to improve their lives/station will not be able to. So the example of already having bats, balls, gloves, and a team to practice with breaks down if you don't have those things to start with. Which is, sorry for the woke term, a privilege you don't realize you have. You probably would've turned out different had you had the privilege of not having to work for every little thing. The argument would then turn to, would your outcome be better or worse with that privilege. But you probably suffered more trauma living the way you did that could've been mitigated by having a few things that most people take for granted: baseball bat or glove to take to little league.  Can't be wrong at something I never said. 

Do you have a bias against educational jobs or people that work them? 

First off...I never took anything personal...not sure why you always feel like that is what is happening??  I was using myself as an example to make the point, which many others have continually tried to make and you just brush over, and that is, people who don't have the resources can get the resources by doing things for themself in order to achieve them.  

Funny part is I KNEW you were going to throw out the word "privilege" eventually.  I actually started to address that proactively in my previous post, but decided to let you bring it up...so predictable.  I wonder when people like you who find the boogey man in everything, think everyone is a victim (except white heterosexual men), think people don't and shouldn't have or take responsibility to their situation and to do something about it.  There is always something or someone to blame for it.  Claiming privilege is a copout in my opinion.  Not because I don't understand or have empathy, but it does no one any good using terms like that including the people you think you are trying to "fight for".  Why make excuses for them versus empower them and telling them they can get out of the "cycle"??  Or is it easier to bring out how crappy slavery was, oppression was, etc., in the past?  I personally think that does nothing for people other than allow them an excuse to not help themselves and to blame someone.  This isn't the 40's/50's any longer.  We have made GREAT progress in regard to equality and access to resources no matter where you happen to be born.  I have a feeling you are too young to have any sort of perspective other than what you read in liberal literature and what you hear at the whacky liberal education institution you work.  You are probably basing it off of what 25 years on earth?  Maybe start listening to people that have been here 50+ years and have seen how much progress has been made?? 

By the way I have nothing against education jobs or the people who work in them...I think most of them are amazing human beings...as long as they don't bring their political agenda into the classroom and try to brainwash the kids.  Heck, my kid tells me about what some teachers say...good thing he is a kid that thinks for himself and always looks at all kinds of perspectives before he makes an opinion...it is sad when he tells me about some of his peers who just takes what their teacher, MSM, social media, etc. spew word for word without thinking about it themselves.

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    Class of 2025
    Committed to North Carolina
    Projected Weight: 133

    Tristan Steldt

    Fennimore, Wisconsin
    Class of 2025
    Committed to Pitt
    Projected Weight: 184

    Casen Roark

    Father Ryan, Tennessee
    Class of 2025
    Committed to West Virginia
    Projected Weight: 141

    Will Greenberg

    Hawken, Ohio
    Class of 2025
    Committed to Bucknell
    Projected Weight: 285
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