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Governor Landry suggests pulling scholarships for athletes who skip National Anthem.


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I am old school. I was bought up to respect my elders. I was brought up to love and respect our country, the flag and our National Anthem and for those who have sacrificed for the freedom and liberty they have afforded me. The Constitution allows for you to disrespectfully protest against the flag, against the National Anthem, against the very people who have afforded you the freedom to protest. I as a Patriotic American find that to be foolish and offensive.


If you were truly a patriotic American you’d be interested in what these people think, and have to say (not these basketball players, of course), that has resulted in them protesting in this manner, as opposed to villainizing them.


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You can believe anything you want to believe. Just because someone else does something wrong does not make ok for you to do something wrong. Mulkey has a disrespectful routine for her team of leaving the court when the National Anthem is being played. This is done to avoid the embarrassment of having players kneeling or sitting down during the national Anthem. Which would bring more scrutiny to her program and team. Believe you want. I don't really care.

Army football does the same.

“ArMy FoOtBaLl HaS gOnE wOkE!”.


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23 minutes ago, JimmyBT said:

That’s where bin Ladin went soooooooooooo ya it does make sense 

Ok so after Bin Ladin was killed what freedom and rights were we fighting for in Afghanistan? 

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7 minutes ago, braves121 said:

Ok so after Bin Ladin was killed what freedom and rights were we fighting for in Afghanistan? 

As he again moves the goal posts.  Oh and it’s called human rights.  You know so a woman can drive a car and not have to cover their faces because a man says they should.  Just admit it. You’re ok with what happened on 911. 

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11 minutes ago, braves121 said:

Ok so after Bin Ladin was killed what freedom and rights were we fighting for in Afghanistan? 

So bin Laden was killed in 2011. It’s 2024.  So 13 years as of May 2nd should answer your dumb ass question.  

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1 minute ago, JimmyBT said:

As he again moves the goal posts.  Oh and it’s called human rights.  You know so a woman can drive a car and not have to cover their faces because a man says they should.  Just admit it. You’re ok with what happened on 911. 

I thought this whole argument was to respect American troops who died for American freedoms and rights. Now you are saying our troops died fighting for human rights so women can drive a car and not cover their faces because a man says they should. If that’s what our job was to prevent we didn’t a really bad job because That happens in Afghanistan now after we were there for years and lost many American lives. Saudi Arabia who is most responsible for 9/11 still has those norms yet you don’t care because we are allies. 

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As he again moves the goal posts.  Oh and it’s called human rights.  You know so a woman can drive a car and not have to cover their faces because a man says they should.  Just admit it. You’re ok with what happened on 911. 


The question originally posed was, more or less, when was the last time an American service member died for the rights of other Americans.

Somehow, American now equals Afghan? And constitutional freedoms equal human rights, according to you?

Speaking of moving the goal posts. Wow.


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Just now, braves121 said:

I thought this whole argument was to respect American troops who died for American freedoms and rights. Now you are saying our troops died fighting for human rights so women can drive a car and not cover their faces because a man says they should. If that’s what our job was to prevent we didn’t a really bad job because That happens in Afghanistan now after we were there for years and lost many American lives. Saudi Arabia who is most responsible for 9/11 still has those norms yet you don’t care because we are allies. 

Because we’re not there anymore.  And ***duck** Saudi Arabia.  

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2 minutes ago, JimmyBT said:

So bin Laden was killed in 2011. It’s 2024.  So 13 years as of May 2nd should answer your dumb ass question.  

Hmmm yes makes total Sense to spend years in Afghanistan when bin Laden was killed in Pakistan….

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2 minutes ago, Le duke said:

 


The question originally posed was, more or less, when was the last time an American service member died for the rights of other Americans.

Somehow, American now equals Afghan? And constitutional freedoms equal human rights, according to you?


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More or less. And yes our military has gone woke.  

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Just now, braves121 said:

Hmmm yes makes total Sense to spend years in Afghanistan when bin Laden was killed in Pakistan….

You sure he was there the entire time?  If so prove it.  

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I was in the army. Most of the people in my unit or battalion couldn't have cared less. If you want to sit on your ass and not stand for the anthem, that's your decision. Forcing or coercing somebody into it is borderline facist. If you want to sit in the locker room because you're preparing for a game, that's your business.

This stupid debate boils down to a few things.

Are they hurting anyone by being in the locker room for the anthem? No.

Does being present or standing for it have any bearing on their performance? No.

Is it any of our business why people do what they do? No.

Do I take it as an insult? No. 

 

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14 hours ago, jross said:

It would not matter if it was 500 years ago.  We should pay our respect.

Sure... we no longer draft MLB players into the military and we have not lost 100K soldiers in a recent war.  The military strategy has changed to global police.  Even if we disagree with the offshort strategy, our military keeps us safe and continues to enable our freedoms. Their sacrifices matter, every single day.

Juveniles --- most likely those without children --- can be quite distasteful.  Fat, happy, talking, kneeling, messing around, ignorant at best... foolish they are IMO...

Seems like you're not asking the obvious question. 'our military keeps us safe and continues to enable our freedoms', but does it?

Someone with their hand on their gun, regardless of your situation, will make you seriously consider what you might think or say to that person. And definitely how you answer any question posed by that person. Being the police, as any police officer will likely tell you, is stressful and not all of them have the tools to deal with that stress. 

Do we, as a country, have those tools? Considering we send out troops to places, often in blatant violation of the constitution, I would say NO.  

Defense contractors contribute to political campaigns and lobbyists. Economic and political ramifications to districts with military bases. One party that tends to send the military to skirmishes more than the other. Sounds, to me, like a big game of 'justify the budget'. 

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11 hours ago, JimmyBT said:

As he again moves the goal posts.  Oh and it’s called human rights.  You know so a woman can drive a car and not have to cover their faces because a man says they should.  Just admit it. You’re ok with what happened on 911. 

Roughly 70,000 civilians were killed in our time in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Seems a bit of a stretch that we were there for human rights with that kind of a stat sheet. 

And there you go again trying to read someone's mind and make unfounded accusations. 

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2 minutes ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

Roughly 70,000 civilians were killed in our time in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Seems a bit of a stretch that we were there for human rights with that kind of a stat sheet. 

And there you go again trying to read someone's mind and make unfounded accusations. 

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11 hours ago, JimmyBT said:

So bin Laden was killed in 2011. It’s 2024.  So 13 years as of May 2nd should answer your dumb ass question.  

If you can't or just don't want to answer the question, fine. How is it helpful that you type out this ⬆️ as if its a definitive answer to anything?

24-13=11

11+13=24

24-11=13

Those are a few of the possible answers. Not sure what those numbers mean. 

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1 minute ago, ThreePointTakedown said:

If you can't or just don't want to answer the question, fine. How is it helpful that you type out this ⬆️ as if its a definitive answer to anything?

24-13=11

11+13=24

24-11=13

Those are a few of the possible answers. Not sure what those numbers mean. 

Talking Danny Devito GIF by The Animal Crackers Movie

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Funny how some like to misdirect and argue semantics when they realize their opinion on a topic is absolutely asinine.  Someone asking when is the last time someone in our military died for our freedoms is such a weak and feeble thought process it isn't even worth discussing.  Talk about entitled and privileged.  All the reasons people can sit here behind a computer screen and spew this ridiculous crap is all thanks to the fine men and woman who unselfishly serve our country to ensure our freedoms are never taken from us.  And they sit there and spit in their face. 

I know I said I wish the idiot who asked about the last time someone died for our freedoms should say it to my brothers face, but I know exactly what he would say because he is a great humble human being....he would say "It was my honor to serve so you can have the ability to say and ask the questions that you do without repercussion." 

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1 hour ago, Bigbrog said:

Funny how some like to misdirect and argue semantics when they realize their opinion on a topic is absolutely asinine.  Someone asking when is the last time someone in our military died for our freedoms is such a weak and feeble thought process it isn't even worth discussing.  Talk about entitled and privileged.  All the reasons people can sit here behind a computer screen and spew this ridiculous crap is all thanks to the fine men and woman who unselfishly serve our country to ensure our freedoms are never taken from us.  And they sit there and spit in their face. 

I know I said I wish the idiot who asked about the last time someone died for our freedoms should say it to my brothers face, but I know exactly what he would say because he is a great humble human being....he would say "It was my honor to serve so you can have the ability to say and ask the questions that you do without repercussion." 

Thank you.

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Accurate

...Baseball fans in the late 19th century might’ve heard live military bands play the Star-Spangled Banner at a game every so often, but the song—which hadn’t yet been designated as the national anthem—wasn’t really a common occurrence at sporting events. That began to change on September 5, 1918, during  Game 1 of the World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the Chicago Cubs.

...Yet even though the event featured two teams at the top of their games, the crowd was somber that day, writes ESPN The Magazine. Since entering the Great War a year and a half ago, more than 100,000 U.S. soldiers had died. And just a day before the game, a bomb had exploded in Chicago, (the city in which the game was held), killing four people and injuring dozens more. In addition, the U.S. government had recently announced that it would begin drafting major league baseball players.

All this sat heavy on the shoulders of both the players and the smaller-than-usual crowd of fans that day. But during the seventh-inning stretch, the U.S. Navy band began to play the Star-Spangled Banner; and something changed.

As the song began, Red Sox infielder Fred Thomas—who was in the Navy and had been granted furlough to play in the World Series—immediately turned toward the American flag and gave it a military salute, according to the Chicago Tribune. Other players turned to the flag with hands over hearts, and the already-standing crowd began to sing. At the song’s conclusion, the previously quiet fans erupted in thunderous applause. At the time, the New York Times reported that it “marked the highest point of the day’s enthusiasm.”

...The Star-Spangled Banner officially became the U.S. national anthem in 1931, and by the end of World War II,  NFL Commissioner Elmer Layden ordered that it be played at every football game. The tradition quickly spread to other sports, aided by the introduction of large sound systems and post-war patriotism.

https://www.history.com/news/why-the-star-spangled-banner-is-played-at-sporting-events

Article 2 continues

...As time passed, playing and singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” became as routine as cracker jacks at ballgames. And for many the patriotic awe faded.

By the mid-1950s, with the nation at peace and increasingly fat and happy, crowds were less erect, less attentive and less respectful as the anthem was played.

In 1954, Ferris reports, the general manager of the Baltimore Orioles, Arthur Ellers, a World War I veteran complained that about the fact that fans went on talking, laughing and moving around as the anthem was played.

“‘To me,'” Ellers said, “‘it’s very distasteful.”

...Of course, while many fans do stop what they’re doing when the anthem is played, remove their hats and shush their children, others still laugh and talk and move about while the anthem is being played.

“The next time you’re at sporting event,” Kyle Koster, wrote in the The Big Lead in May, “take a look around notice how many people are locked into their phones, sipping their beer or worse during the playing of the anthem. It’s impossible to know someone’s inner thoughts, but the outward actions suggest someone counting the seconds until they can yell, ‘play ball’ instead of basking in freedoms of the First Amendment.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/08/30/a-brief-history-of-the-star-spangled-banner-being-played-at-games-and-getting-no-respect/

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